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“We were biking in a park. The path was long, and the sun was shining, and after 30 or 60 minutes following the shade of the trees, we got lost. It was not that we lost our way, but that we lost our perception to the complexity of trees and the sky. We were lost because of the warmth of the sun, the greens of the trees, the white and blue of the sky, and the long wait that a winter seemed would have never ended, while suddenly summer arrived. We were lost because somehow life revealed itself to us and dominated us within its endless and unpredictable power. So, we lay under the bright sun and the trees. Being part of nature but with the outfit of civilization, we were eager to embrace what we were, and where we were from, and at the same time to feel lost in the insignificance of the present. We were longing for an origin, which might not be a country or a land, but a sea. For how far and how long we have been away from it - the sea, where life began. Taiwan is surrounded by sea. Whenever my 5 year-old son Shaore asked me how we get there, I have always responded “by airplanes”. The sea is a a barrier separating us from the piece of land we came from, not a carrier to bring us home. When we think of the concept of returning, it resides in the process of becoming: we are not going back, but we are becoming the land itself, defining our position as we hold each other’s hands, and looking into each other’s eyes as we search for traces of our life. We are a unit, and we are inseparable. One’s longing becomes the other’s longing, and one’s pain becomes the other’s pain. The work presented in this exhibition derives from the personal approaches of understanding the relation with nature and with family members while examining the construction of perception. Photography as the main medium is to experiment with the observation of quotidian experience, but it also serves as a failed attempt to grasp what might be seen but not yet captured. This body of works aims at pursuing the absence of origin and embrace the process of becoming. The work consists of three bodies of images: Sun Father Son, A Photo of Summer and Little Gestures. They work around a vague yet consistent intent of understanding one’s current position in relation to nature, to surroundings, to space, to origin, and to close family members. Instead of being rational this research is following a flow of unpredictable and subjective experiences. Repetition of gestures and examination of perception take important roles in the process while the surface of materials and the use of media form part of the narrative. The shared interests in the three series link each other to form the work in Distance to the Sea. Photography is a medium to examine the surface of the past in dialogue with the present, while multiple perceptions are formed in a way not to provide a fixed point of view but to propose a sense of losing orientation. The work proposes a process of rooting in the land, even if we are longing for the sea.” - Chih-Chien Wang


The gallery is pleased to present its seventh exhibition of work by the renowned photojournalist Larry Towell. This exhibition concentrates on photographs made in Afghanistan between 2008 and 2011, the subject of a major monograph published by Aperture Foundation.

For 30 years, Afghanistan has known only war. With this work, Towell presents a moving and in-depth look at the country, whose citizens and landscapes are affected by conflict on a daily basis. A veteran conflict reporter, Towell has worked in Nicaragua, El Salvador, Vietnam, Mexico, Africa, Palestine and Afghanistan. This work offers a tour de force examination of survival, exile, loss and recuperation. Towell shows the war from a variety of perspectives – from military camps to domestic interiors – and offers depictions of US soldiers, landmine victims, ordinary Afghan citizens, cityscapes and weaponry, as well as a rare series of Taliban portraits.

The exhibition displays key photographs taken over the course of his time spent in Afghanistan, and begins with his famous image taken at Ground Zero in New York City on September 11, 2001. His 35mm work seen together with his panoramas offer an insightful report that bears witness to the lives of Afghanis living amongst conflict.

This new publication presents a facsimile of the photographer's original artist maquette, complete with his handwritten notes, stories, and over 350 images, including collages. A true art object, this book conveys the complexity of the conflict, which has roots that go deep into historical and tribal grievances. Beautifully produced in a limited edition, this extraordinary compilation offers an important historical document on present-day Afghanistan seen through its social, political and environmental landscapes.

Larry Towell is the first Canadian born member of the prestigious Magnum Photos Agency, whose photographers bridge the divide between journalism and art, and between the objective statement and the personal point of view. Towell’s work is exhibited and collected around the world. He is the author of 11 books, including: The World from My Front Porch (Archive of Modern Conflict / Bulger Gallery Press, 2008); The Cardboard House (Trolley, 2008); No Man’s Land (Textuel / Chris Boot, 2005); The Mennonite’s (Phaidon, 2000); Then Palestine (Aperture, 1998) and El Salvador (W. W. Norton & Company, 1997). Larry is also the author of four original music CDs and two films, including Indecisive Moments which won a 2008 Achievement in Filmmaking Award at the New York independent Film and Video Festival.

About Larry Towell

Towell lives with his family and sharecrops a seventy-five acre farm in Southwestern Ontario. He was raised in a large rural family and is the son of an auto body repairman. As a teenager, Towell’s father once scolded him for wanting to drive to Florida with a friend. It was too far from home and he would be corrupted by the distance. While Towell studied visual arts at York University in Toronto (1972 –76), he was given a camera and taught how to process black-and-white film. He brought the camera home, because there was no other place on earth he wanted to photograph more.

During a stint of volunteer work in Calcutta in 1976, Towell began photographing and writing, questioning the distribution of wealth and issues of land and landlessness. When he returned, he supported himself and his family by teaching folk music for several years. In 1984, he also became a freelance photographer and writer, focusing on the dispossessed, exile, and peasant rebellion. He completed projects on the Nicaraguan contra war, the relatives of the ‘Disappeared’ of Guatemala, and US Vietnam veterans who had returned to help rebuild war-damaged Vietnam.

Towell’s first published magazine essay, “Paradise Lost,” was about the ecological consequences of the Exxon Valdez catastrophe in Prince William Sound, Alaska. His experience as a poet in the 1970s and as a folk musician in the 1980s did much to shape his style.

Everywhere he travels he concentrates on intimacy. In 1997, Towell completed a major story on the Palestinians. In 1996, he completed a project based on ten years of reportage in El Salvador. His fascination with landlessness simultaneously led him to the Mennonite migrant workers of Mexico, a ten year work-in-progress.

Towell has exhibited broadly in Europe and North America and his work is housed in major collections. His reportage has appeared in magazines that include: The New York Times, LIFE, GEO and Stern. Towell has been the recipient of numerous photography awards that include several World Press and Pictures of the Year awards, the Henri Cartier-Bresson Award, a Eugene Smith, the Oskar Barnak, Ernst Haas, Roloff Beny, Alfred Eisenstadt, and a Hasselblad award. In 1988, he became a nominee for Magnum Photo Agency and in 1993 he became a full member.

Image credit: Juma Gul, Charahi Qambar Refugee Camp, Kabul, Afghanistan, 2011 © Larry Towell / Magnum Photos


Newzones is pleased to announce a solo exhibition by John Folsom entitled, "Diminishing Returns".

John Folsom's new series of process oriented photographs presents the area of Banff, Alberta as a historically picturesque destination while illuminating some of the problems associated with climate change. Conceived during a 2 week residency at the Banff Centre, this series was created using a combination of techniques. Photographs are enhanced and obscured by the use of oil paint and other media presenting the hiking trails of the park system as a grand introspective escape. This romantic vision invites the viewer to bring their own reference, moving the work beyond its specific geography to a place inhabiting personal memory.

An installation component will complement "Diminishing Returns". Comprised of 3 turntables and 2 sound pieces, recordings of the low rumbling of an avalanche will play continuously during the exhibition.

Folsom is interested in the space of land as a cultural construct and its relationship to the aesthetic issues of the history of painting and the tourist experience. His practice demonstrates the collective potential of landscape images through the intersection of painting and photography.

John Folsom graduated from the Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL with a BA in Cinema and Photography. His work has been exhibited extensively throughout North America and can be found in collections around the world, including Christoph Merian Foundation, Basel Switzerland, Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee State Museum, Nashville, TN and the Fulton County Arts Council, Atlanta GA, as well as many private collections.










The Pianola Project The Pianola Project is based on a player piano roll of Pete Wendling’s song “Hesitation Blues”. This was used as a template to transfer the placement of notes onto a 4 x 18 ft roll of paper. The original height of the scroll is 1 ft, which is scaled up to 4 ft on the large paper, embellishing the original in fractal-inspired way inspired by Benoit Mandelbrot’s theory of noise and disturbance. The structure retained from the enlargement of the original player piano roll are compositional guides for the drawing, dictated in part by “Hesitation Blues”. This lack of control over the composition has made the process of realizing the drawing more about re-vealing rather than inventing. Through the drawing I am interpreting the original player piano roll’s information in my own artistic language. Using the guidelines of original player piano roll manufacturing, the speed and format was interpolated. Piano rolls are governed by rules that control the pitch, tone and volume. The Buffalo Convention of December 10, 1908 established two roll formats. “Hesitation Blues” works out to a tempo of 70 signifying 7 feet of paper traveling in one minute, setting the duration of the song at 2min 18s. The movement of sound also relates to the length or the drawing: the technical description of hertz(Hz) uses Feet. The 18 ft of the drawing translates as 19.0556 Hz - a frequency that sits at the very beginning of the human ear’s capacity to hear. Through a process of retro-engineering the drawing was returned to sound using computer music software and a new program design specifically for this project. This computer program plays through the guidelines and mathematics of the original structure the drawing is based upon. The outcome retains a lingering shadow of the original song; peeking through the new layers of information - either barely audible or structurally dominant as an imperfect rendering mixed with new notes and information; a new composition, re-arranged in a drawing. - Naomi Cook -- Naomi Cook is a multi-disciplinary artist based in Montreal. Cook’s technique stems from interests in engravings, sound, and visual representations of data. In 2005 she founded Red Bird Gallery and Studios in Montreal, working as director and curator until 2010. She subsequently relocated to Berlin, where she worked as assistant to Ralf Ziervogal, collaborating on several projects and proposals including an immersive architectural work. Several recent works were featured in the 2014 edition of POP Montreal.






















Newzones is pleased to announce a solo exhibition entitled “Efflorescence” by Anda Kubis.

As part of the New Abstraction movement in Canada, Kubis continues her play with colour, space and illusion. Painterly and improvisational, Kubis' work continues to capture a screen-like illumination from within the picture with light clusters and refractions across the surface of the canvas.

Strongly inspired by Modern color-field painting, Kubis uses color to reflect an entirely contemporary world – a world seen with light. Her paintings act as a place of visual contemplation, a place for the eye to meander through finely tuned chromatic relationships.

“Efflorescence”, a time of peak blossoming, aptly describes compositions that have emerged from random grounds of colour. Kubis relies on an intuitive sense of colour to arrange and rearrange a composition. The slow material exploration that oil painting requires, results in eruptions of highly tuned colour relationships and idiosyncratic compositions. Kubis encourages the open, associative reading of her work while likening it to imaginary chemical and biological reactions.

Born in Toronto, Ontario, Anda Kubis received her BFA from Nova Scotia College of Art and Design and her MFA at York University. For eight years, Kubis taught at York University and at the University of Lethbridge in Alberta. Currently, Kubis is an Associate Dean at OCAD University. Her paintings have been widely exhibited across Canada in numerous solo and group exhibitions. Her work can be found in private and corporate collections throughout North America, including Bank of Montreal, Nova Scotia Art Bank, Cenovus Energy, Calgary and Encana, Calgary, to name a few.


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