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Please join us for the opening reception of Myth and Mystique: The Art of Malcolm Rains, our first solo exhibition for the renowned Canadian contemporary artist, on Saturday, May 7th from 2-5 pm.

It's not only that Malcolm Rains is a master of many styles and that each one looks the way a spoken dialect in language sounds: he is in fact a master stylist, period. Each of his motifs belongs to a broad and deep painting territory which he traverses and revisits the same way we can return to Rome or Athens to follow our own footsteps and yet still feel it's a first time encounter. There's something hauntingly familiar, gently reassuring and yet utterly otherworldly in the way this artist can explore major subjects over a long term career trajectory.

One such subject is a domain he has confidently commanded for over a decade, the kind of crisp representation I can only call objective portraiture. Whether it's the way fruit occupies space on a table, or the way light is refracted from a glowing metallic surface of pure colour, or the way creased paper can assume the awesome stature of a mountain, one recursive element remains shared by them all: optical splendour and its transmission.

These new images by Rains, all meticulously rendered in oil on linen in the precise manner which has become one of his signature styles, and all breathtakingly beautiful, also call into question any artificial barriers or boundaries between the formats and themes of art history as we've become accustomed to it. They offer us instead the fabula of a non-localized reality.














Along with Jack Bush, William Perehudoff is one of the most celebrated Canadian Colour Field painters of his generation.

Beginning his career in the early 1940s, Perehudoff carried on a dialogue with American Colour Field and European abstract movements. By 1949, he was studying in New York with Amédée Ozenfant, who founded the Purist Movement with Le Corbusier in 1918.

In 1962, Perehudoff met Clement Greenberg, the most important art critic in the New York School of Painting. As a result of his meetings with Greenberg in New York and at the Emma Lake Workshops in Saskatchewan, a shift in Perehudoff’s painting took place and his focus turned to formalist abstraction.

Throughout his career, Perehudoff received accolades in commissions, exhibitions and awards, including exhibitions at the Noah Goldowsky Gallery, New York, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC, Meredith Long Contemporary, New York, and several exhibitions at the Mendel Art Gallery, Saskatoon. Perehudoff continued to receive several honors in the 1990s and 2000s. He was a member of the Order of Canada and the Royal Academy of Art, held an Honorary Doctorate of Laws from the University of Regina, received the Saskatchewan Order of Merit and was awarded the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal.

In 2010, Perehudoff was the focus of a full-scale traveling retrospective organized by the Mendel Art Gallery, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, curated by Karen Wilkin, esteemed art critic and the foremost expert on Colour Field painting. In her essay, Wilkin writes, “Perehudoff’s abstractions (…) are self-evidently autonomous constructions in the language of paint, deliberately detached from explicit reference. Their aim is plainly not to replicate appearances but rather to stir our emotions through wordless relationships of colour, eloquent intervals, thoughtfully deployed shapes, and nuanced surfaces.”














The gallery is pleased to present “Exhibitionism,” our first solo exhibition of work by American photographer Cynthia Greig.

In this exhibition, Greig surveys contemporary art galleries from across the globe, placing the exhibition space itself on display. Deconstructing the white cube down to its most essential elements, her elegantly minimal photographs present an unexpected shift in perspective, rendering its interior spaces as vast landscapes or archaeological sites—uncharted territories with their own particular histories. Greig’s photographs also scrutinize the minute and overlooked details, revealing the interstitial evidence of each building’s trajectory, and the continuous flux of time brought to bear on an impossibly pristine Modernist ideal. Reflecting on the delicate balance between the permanent and ephemeral, Greig visits the themes of vanitas, manifest destiny, and the economic theory of “too big to fail” from within the microcosmic framework of this mythic space.

The exhibition presents photographs and video from four related bodies of work each centered on the contemporary art gallery as a site of inquiry, and continue Greig’s investigation into the illusory nature of the photographic image and perceived reality. “Gallery Horizons” and “Gone (Circles and Squares)” transform close-up views of drywall and/or concrete into ambiguous topographies suggestive of rugged terrains or the traces of and ancient civilization. For her series entitled, “Threshold,” Greig digitally removes the art on view to shift our focus to the expanding scale of the contemporary exhibition space. “Gallery Interventions” mark the white walls of commercial galleries throughout Chelsea as “sold”—whether as art or real estate— making ironic reference to the current geographic shift as some galleries play out a Darwinian drama by expanding their brands to multiple locations across the globe while others close, migrate to new areas, downsize, or go completely virtual.

Meditating on the white void and the idea of nothingness, “Exhibitionism” demystifies the context of art’s display and commerce to reveal the forces of entropy at play, regardless of hierarchies of status or influence. As if in search of an extinct species or a lost empire, she has photographed the contemporary art gallery as a metaphor for a world on the brink of dramatic change.
















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